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Find Articles & Journals

Core Databases & Journals

Core Databases

The databases listed here are among the most commonly used in education-related research. If your research interest takes you outside of the disciplines represented in this list, find many other options, grouped by subject, here.

Hover over a database's title to see a short description of what it contains.

Search for a Specific Journal  When you need to see if Bethel has access

If the journal does not appear in the search below, or the available date range does not match the date you need, request the item via ILLiad.

 

 

 

Core Education Journals A selected list available through BUL

To browse issues, click on the links below and choose an issue.
To find articles within these journals, you'll want a journal index like ERIC, where you can use search terms for your topic and limit the search to a journal name.
Note: For the Chronicle of Higher Ed, click on the small login link on this page and scroll through alpha list.

See also:

 How do I get the full text of an article?

 What is an empirical research article?

 What's the difference between a popular journal, a trade journal, and a scholarly journal?

 How do I get/use a permalink for an article?

 How do I evaluate my sources?

 Setting up Database Alerts

 Conducting Effective Searches

 Finding articles with Google Scholar


 Get Help

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Find Books/ebooks

Book searching & featured titles

Search for books and ebooks

Can't find the item you were looking for?

  • Search CLICsearch for items at Bethel or partner libraries
  • Try WorldCat for a search of nearly all libraries

Featured Titles 

See also:

 Do I have a Bethel Library Card?

 What is my library barcode number?

 Can I have a book mailed to me?

 Find ebooks using Google Books


 Get Help

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Find Reference Sources

For topic overviews and background information

Electronic Reference Sources

Reference books are not intended to be read cover to cover. They're to be consulted for background, context, definition and outline, and they usually include brief but excellent bibliographies that point you to further research on the subject. They're a great place to get quick info, or to get a basic grounding in something with which you may not be overly familiar.

See also:

 What about Wikipedia? How does it compare to the above sources?

 How do I find print reference sources?


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Find Tests & Measures

In print, through BUL databases, and on the open Web

Find Tests/Measures Using PsycTESTS

PsycTESTS®, produced by the American Psychological Association (APA), serves as a repository for a growing selection of psychological tests and measures, including thousands of actual test instruments and test items that are available for immediate download and use in research and teaching.

The interface looks like PsycINFO, but the contents are restricted to tests. Use words associated with what you want to measure. You may want to search PsycINFO first, to get a sense for the best terminology to use.

PsycTESTS Search BoxClick to enlarge

Find Tests/Measures Using ERIC

ERIC contains nearly 30,000 theses and dissertations, and most documents from 1996 to the present are available in full text online.
NOTE:  In ERIC bachelor's, master's, and doctoral theses are all given the source type of "Dissertation/Thesis," so note the degree for which the thesis was completed in the item record as you browse.

One of the best ways to find tests (AKA measures, scales, instruments, surveys, questionnaires, assessment, evaluation) is to search the journal literature in your discipline. For Education research, the best place to look is ERIC. After ERIC, try PsycINFO, which indexes tests and measures of all kinds.

OK. But how? It's easy, really. Once you formulate your search (see the "Search Tips" section of this guide on the "Find Articles" tab), add a variety of terms commonly used to describe assessment or evaluation, like this:

ERIC Search BoxClick to enlarge

 

Among your results, you'll find various studies that use some kind of instrument. Sometimes these are reproduced within the article, and sometimes only mentioned. If you need to find a test that is mentioned in an article, check the reference list to see its source. You can also try searching the database using the name of the test. Not all of these will be available to students, but some will. Remember that professional ethics require that if the article does not explicitly grant permission to use a test reproduced in its entirety, you should attempt to contact the author for permission. Contact information is usually provided within the PsycINFO record. Or ask your friendly librarian for help!

Test Resources on the Web

Tests & Measurements Books in Print

See also:

 What's the difference between a "published" and "unpublished" test?


 Get Help

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Find Theses & Dissertations

Library Search--Dissertations

How do I Track Down a Specific Thesis?

What if you need a particular thesis and it’s NOT freely available online? You have two options: 1) use interlibrary loan to request a copy OR 2) purchase a copy. Instructions follow.

Request a copy via ILL (Interlibrary Loan)
Note: theses are often physically owned by only one library at the degree-granting institution. Some libraries will loan their copy, some will not. It’s always OK to try, but it’s not a sure thing that you’ll get it.

  • Find a record for the thesis in the WorldCat catalog. From there you can click on the Request Item button, log in with your Bethel account, and submit the form.

OR

  • Find a record for the thesis in a Bethel database like ERIC or PsycINFO. Click on the link to Search for Bethel Libraries Full Text. Look for the link to request.
    See how to do this here.

OR

  • Fill out a blank ILL form. Find a link to ILLiad, our requesting system, on the library’s website (Library Accounts link). Login with your Bethel account. Click on the link for Dissertation/Thesis requests. Fill out the form and submit it.

Purchase a Copy
The Proquest company sells copies of most dissertations in either hardcopy or PDF. You can buy them directly, but if you purchase via the library you’ll get a discounted rate ($30 vs. $37). If you’d like us to order it for you at the discounted rate, please send an email to Rhonda Gilbraith with the full citation (title, author, date, etc.).

And Last But Not Least
It's always worth trying a search engine--Google, Bing, or your favorite--using quotation marks around the title and perhaps the author's last name, if the title isn't unique--to see if the author has posted the dissertation on the web somewhere. It's surprising how often this is the case.

And for cases where you can't find a free copy, but you CAN find contact info for the author, try to get in touch with the author and ask if they'd be willing to share a copy of their thesis with you. Many people are thrilled that someone is interested in their blood-sweat-and-tears project, and would happily oblige.

Find Statistics, Reports & Assessment Resources

Statistics & Assessment Resources

Reports & Other Government Resources

Federal Govt. & Other National

Minnesota Education

Get Help

Contact a librarian

Contact an EdD Subject Librarian

       

Rhonda Gilbraith

Office:  HC 315

651-638-6221

Email Rhonda

Karen Dubay

Office:  HC 315A

651-638-6479

Email Karen

   

 

Contact the BUL Reference Desk

Phone: 651-638-6588

Text: 651-728-5305

Email the Reference Desk

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